Beauty is often seen as a frivolous pursuit, however, pair beauty with cutting-edge technology, and you’re looking at a $42.9B market. Beauty tech is a huge industry; from the Opte skin perfecting makeup printer to at-home IPL treatments, innovation in the beauty space is keeping pace with every other tech sector. With printable makeup and skincare already on the market and app-based tech that can diagnose skin conditions from a selfie, what’s next? 

If trends at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2020 are anything to go by, beauty tech is not only on the rise, but is thriving.

“That’s an excellent suggestion, Miss Triggs. Perhaps one of the men here would like to make it.” Though a ‘joke’, the classic Punch Magazine cartoon by Riana Duncan is one which is awfully recognizable for many women (and men, if they’re honest) and one that we are all all too familiar with in the workplace.  

Last month, on International Women’s Day,  our four female managing directors shared their experiences with equality in the workplace during a panel discussion

In my conversation with Kara Silverman (New York), Monica Feig (Los Angeles) and Rachel Gilley (London), it became clear that even in the world of communications, where women are strongly represented, there is still much to fight for. 

Women’s History Month may be coming to an end, but we at Clarity are so fortunate to work with incredible female founders and executives every single day — and we’ve enjoyed sharing some of their career experiences and learnings over the past few weeks. Our latest post comes from an interview between Monica Feig, Managing Director of Clarity Los Angeles, and Milena Bogdanova Bursztyn, venture investor at Germin8 Ventures, a purpose-driven venture capital firm that believes in the power of technology to fix the global food system.…

As part of our ongoing ‘Clarity in Conversation’ series for Women’s History Month, Rachel Gilley, Clarity London MD, sat down with Melina (Mel) Jacovou, Founder & CEO of Propel London, to chat about her experiences making her own space as an LGBT+ woman in the male-dominated tech and recruiting world, her thoughts on what recruiting and hiring practices are needed to attract and retain diverse candidates, and her advice for up-and-comers.

This interview has been lightly edited for clarity and length.

Throughout Women’s History Month, Clarity’s team has been sitting down with female leaders in tech, finance, PR and beyond to discuss with them their career journeys, experiences within their industry, views on progress for women in the workplace, and the work that we still have yet to do. In our latest post, Vice President, Christine Reilly sat down with Siran Cao and Mel Faxon, co-founders of Mirza, a startup focused on helping close the gender pay gap, providing tools and community to parents understand and budget for the costs that often prevent women from returning to the workforce and participating fully postpartum. 

Today, Clarity is excited to announce the launch of our global  partner agency network, Clarity Connections. We’re thrilled to be working with leaders in communications, public relations, digital media and content across the globe and offering localized communications and digital services across North America & Canada, Latin America, EMEA and APAC. Read the full release below:

Clarity, a global integrated communications agency recently commended by PRWeek as both Best International Agency, and winner of Specialist Consultancy of the Year, today announces the launch of its global  partner agency network, Clarity Connections. 

Once upon a time, a famous gin brand launched a London-only marketing campaign. It was so successful that they reached half the population of the entire world.

Sound too good to be true? 

Of course it was. 

But did the reach and impression numbers support that claim? Via a campaign that focused only on a city of 9 million people?

Of course they did.

Which is why vanity metrics are such a dangerous thing. 

So, how do you distinguish between vanity and sanity?

Last week, I had the pleasure of participating in The P World’s Measurement and Evaluation Bootcamp, where I shared with delegates some of my experiences building out measurement and evaluation capabilities, and taking clients on a journey towards better understanding the effectiveness of their communication efforts and investments. I received a lot of feedback on my session, so I took the time  to summarize the key points here for those  who were unable to attend:

PR people suck (at this)

The PR profession has, historically, done a really poor job at proving its worth.

Prior to joining Clarity, I worked in the audio world for a podcasting company and have always loved audio as a medium for communication. Even during this pandemic, when there is zero commuting for me, I am still listening to podcasts upwards of 2 hours a day.

Audio is an incredibly intimate and authentic medium, creating a feeling of accessibility between listener and talker that is hard to find elsewhere . It’s great for going deep into a topic and it’s really portable!

My completely unscientific research tells me that the most talked-about Super Bowl ad this year was for Jeep, featuring an extremely rare commercial appearance by Bruce Springsteen. In it, there is no mention of Jeep’s features and benefits, and barely any shots of the vehicle at all. Instead, we hear The Boss pleading for Americans to meet ‘in The Middle’, in what is effectively a reworking of the campaign ad he made for Joe Biden. It’s an ad not for a product or a brand, but for a set of values. 

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